Thursday, 23rd November 2017

Historical overview: The Centre for Molecular Biology "Severo Ochoa" (CBMSO) is internationally recognized for its multidisciplinary research in different fields of Biology and Biomedicine. Since its foundation in 1975, under the scientific counselling of the Nobel prize winner Severo Ochoa, the CBMSO has performed a pivotal role in fostering state of the art research in Molecular Biology. Research at the CBMSO resulted in seminal contributions that have become basic concepts in textbooks. These include deciphering the genetic structure of the Drosophila bithorax complex, fundamental for understanding body segmentation, the characterization of the Drosophila achaete-scute complex, which explained how early neurogenesis occurs, and the identification of a novel mechanism of DNA replication using proteins as primer. At the same time, the CBMSO has formed generations of scientists who now lead the most relevant Spanish research Centres or have developed successful careers abroad. Strong from the start and far from being anchored in its past, the CBMSO has subsequently evolved to its current mission of performing research at the forefront of Molecular Biomedicine, faithful to its commitment of providing the best training for the future leaders of Spanish and international research.

Current organization: The CBMSO is now organised in 5 complementary scientific departments that cover different aspects of Molecular Biomedicine: Cell Biology and Immunology, Virology and Microbiology, Development and Regeneration, Molecular Neurobiology and Genome Dynamics and Function. This structure is reinforced with 11 Core Facilities, 7 Technical Services, a competent Administration Office and a Scientific Outreach/Press office. A Directive Board governs the Centre with the assistance of an Internal Scientific Committee (ISC). An external Scientific Advisory Board (SAB), composed of internationally renowned scientists, provides the Centre with strategic insights, external counselling and analysis of the research groups’ performance every 5 years.